What To Expect Project
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#BumpDay 2020 Campaign Prompts Action for Expectant Black Moms

Washington, July 23, 2020 — The 6th annual #BumpDay - a social media advocacy campaign organized by What To Expect and the What To Expect Project in collaboration with a diverse range of partners, raised awareness and support among hundreds of thousands of expectant moms, friends, families, advocates, decision-makers, and other leaders posting social media messages about the urgent need to reduce the high rate of maternal deaths among Black moms, and to address disparities in health care. This message has been especially critical this year with the challenges presented by COVID-19. 

#BumpDay is also a day to celebrate all beautiful bumps and healthy pregnancies, so on July 22 people in support posted their favorite baby bump photo (past or present) and they collectively reached countless people in the U.S. and globally. 

Most complications from pregnancy and childbirth could be prevented or managed if women had access to quality prenatal care. Sadly, 1 in 5 births worldwide happens without that assistance. Even in the U.S., about 15 percent of women receive inadequate prenatal care, and Black women are 3 to 4 times more likely to die of pregnancy-related complications than white women.

The COVID-19 pandemic threatens to restrict access to quality maternal health care even further. 

Notable participants included U.S. Senators Tammy Duckworth, Chris Coons and Richard Blumenthal, and TV personalities Sarah Haines of Good Morning America, Jessica Moore of CBS, and Bravo's Jenni Pulos.  Leading domestic and global health entities and organizations also participated, including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, March of Dimes, the National Partnership for Women & Families, the National Association of County Health Officials, mothers2mothers, Project Hope, the Hunger Project, Pathfinder International, and Jhpiego. 

Among media covering the event were Forbes Magazine, #BumpDay Highlights Coronavirus And Racial Disparities In Pregnancy, and an interview on The Rickey Smiley Show with author and founder of the What To Expect Project, Heidi Murkoff.

More information about the What To Expect Project and #BumpDay is found at www.WhatToExpectProject.org.

Thank You All Who Participated in the 6th Annual Bump Day on July 22, 2020!

Hundreds of thousands of users across the web and social media posted a photo of their favorite baby bump on Bump Day 2020 and shared the message that Every Mom Deserves a Safe Pregnancy and Healthy Beginning for the Baby She Loves.

#BumpDay 2020 Campaign Prompts Action for Expectant Black Moms

Washington, July 23, 2020 — The 6th annual #BumpDay - a social media advocacy campaign organized by What To Expect and the What To Expect Project in collaboration with a diverse range of partners, raised awareness and support among hundreds of thousands of expectant moms, friends, families, advocates, decision-makers, and other leaders posting social media messages about the urgent need to reduce the high rate of maternal deaths among Black moms, and to address disparities in health care. This message has been especially critical this year with the challenges presented by COVID-19.

#BumpDay is also a day to celebrate all beautiful bumps and healthy pregnancies, so on July 22 people in support posted their favorite baby bump photo (past or present) and they collectively reached countless people in the U.S. and globally.

Most complications from pregnancy and childbirth could be prevented or managed if women had access to quality prenatal care. Sadly, 1 in 5 births worldwide happens without that assistance. Even in the U.S., about 15 percent of women receive inadequate prenatal care, and Black women are 3 to 4 times more likely to die of pregnancy-related complications than white women.

The COVID-19 pandemic threatens to restrict access to quality maternal health care even further.

Notable participants included U.S. Senators Tammy Duckworth, Chris Coons and Richard Blumenthal, and TV personalities Sarah Haines of Good Morning America, Jessica Moore of CBS, and Bravo's Jenni Pulos.  Leading domestic and global health entities and organizations also participated, including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, March of Dimes, the National Partnership for Women & Families, the National Association of County Health Officials, mothers2mothers, Project Hope, the Hunger Project, Pathfinder International, and Jhpiego.

Among media covering the event were Forbes Magazine, #BumpDay Highlights Coronavirus And Racial Disparities In Pregnancy, and an interview on The Rickey Smiley Show with author and founder of the What To Expect Project, Heidi Murkoff.

More information about the What To Expect Project and #BumpDay is found at www.WhatToExpectProject.org.

Thank You All Who Participated in the 6th Annual Bump Day on July 22, 2020!

Hundreds of thousands of users across the web and social media posted a photo of their favorite baby bump on Bump Day 2020 and shared the message that Every Mom Deserves a Safe Pregnancy and Healthy Beginning for the Baby She Loves.

What is #BumpDay?

#BumpDay is a day to raise awareness and support so that every mom gets the help she needs to deliver a healthy start in life for the baby she loves. But it’s also a day to celebrate all beautiful bumps and healthy pregnancies, past and present.

Why is #BumpDay Important?

That’s why I’m reaching out to you about #BumpDay, a joint project from Heidi Murkoff, What To Expect, the What To Expect Project and the International Medical Corps that shines a light on the crucial issue of maternal health.

In the past, we’ve counted Debra Messing, Kris Jenner, Molly Sims, Heidi Klum, TODAY Parents, and Refinery 29 among our supporters. We hope you’ll join us to support this remarkable cause by raising awareness of the physical and mental health needs of moms through pregnancy and the first year of their new child’s life, and to help level the inequity of maternal health care among women and new babies in America.

What if we told you that 800 women die every day around the world from preventable pregnancy-related causes or in child birth? In the U.S. 2 out of 3 pregnancy related deaths are preventable, and African-American, Native American and Alaska Native women are 3 to 4 times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women. You’d probably say, “We have to change that,” right?

Why Maternal Health Matters

In The United States

• African-American, Native American & Alaska Native women are 3 to 4 times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women. This must change.

• 24% of maternal deaths happen 6 or more weeks after a woman gives birth.

• 2 out of 3 pregnancy-related deaths are preventable. (Source for preceding data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

• 15% of pregnant women in the U.S. receive inadequate prenatal care. In 2018, 1 in 7 infants was born to a woman receiving inadequate prenatal care. (Source: National Centers for Health Statistics)

• COVID-19 stressors in 2020 have been especially tough for expectant and new moms everywhere— In the U.S., by the end of May the CDC found pregnant women to be significantly more likely to be hospitalized, admitted to the intensive care unit, and to receive mechanical ventilation than nonpregnant women infected with this new coronavirus.

• Healthcare disparities and other socio economic factors leave 50% of all expectant moms in the U.S. using Medicaid for prenatal and postpartum care, but currently Medicaid only covers the first 2 months post birth, and children are most suseptable in their first year of life. This must change to cover the entire first year of birth.

Worldwide

• 800+ women die each day from pregnancy-related causes. Most of those deaths are preventable.

• 1 in 5 births happen without a skilled birth attendant. (Source: World Health Organization)

Why and How To Participate in #Bump Day

Post Your Bump to Instagram
and other sites with #BumpDay and @WhatToExpect
Share About #BumpDay
See the Bump Day Social Media Toolkit

• On July 22, 2020, post a photo of you and your current or past beautiful bump on Instagram with the #BumpDay hashtag and @WhatToExpect, and ask others to do the same.

• Help raise awareness of this special and vulnerable time for expectant moms and new moms, no matter what their path to bringing a child into their world, and for the challenging and time for both mom and baby through the first year

• Find more resources for information, help and how to help get others involved at https://www.whattoexpectproject.org/resources

• See more information and resources for how to help and get others involved at the  What To Expect Project resources page, and the #BumpDay social media page.

FOUNDING PARTNERS

What to Expect, the world's best-known and most-loved pregnancy and parenting brand is bringing together a coalition of organizations equally devoted to supporting and empowering moms and dads everywhere before, during, and after pregnancy.

What To Expect is the world’s best-known, most trusted pregnancy and parenting brand, helping every parent know what to expect, every step of the way. The What To Expect brand mission is as simple as it is powerful: “Support happy, healthy pregnancies and happy, healthy babies.”

Getting maternal-child care (including prenatal care and safer delivery practices) where it's most needed, to moms-to-be in areas of the world devastated by war, natural disaster and disease. International Medical corps' training programs also bring midwives to places where pregnancy care is virtually nonexistent.

The What To Expect Project is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating and empowering moms in need, in the U.S. and around the world, so that they can expect healthier pregnancies, safer deliveries, healthier babies, and healthier futures.

THANKS TO OUR PARTNERS

MEDIA PARTNERS